BL-headlines

Osama Bin Laden’s Death

Good evening.  Tonight, I can report to the American people and to the world that the United States has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden, the leader of al Qaeda, and a terrorist who’s responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women, and children.

These were the words spoken by President Obama on May 2nd 2011.  It was enormously important news, and something noted by historians everywhere as a major event.  Let’s learn more about this story from many different perspectives.

First, let’s learn as much on this event as possible:

You can also see how many newspapers around the world created their headlines for that important day:

Next, let’s examine some ideas on how this event can be taught in the classroom:

You can also explore how this is a teachable moment by looking at dozens of other events and issues brought to the classroom from current events.  There’s a huge list here:

Let’s also take a look at a classroom exercise concerning US policy in Afghanistan and the options for the US on the War on Terror following Bin Laden’s death:

Who are the people who fight for Osama Bin Laden?  Take a look at this PBS Frontline documentary that goes behind the scenes of Al Qaeda in Afghanistan.

What was it like to be in the war room in the White House watching the operation take place live?  Take a look here.

Think of what it is like for soldiers to kill.  There is a lot more here than action and adventure.  This documentary explores those in the military who choose non-violence.  It’s an interesting counterpoint to the excitement of the raid on Bin Laden.

What about the cost?  Since 9/11 there has been a huge amount of money spent on the war on terror.  How much?  Take a look here:

And also take a look at the cost of both wars (Afghanistan and Iraq) here.  It’s constantly going up according to how much money Congress appropriates.  Here’s a snapshot on Monday morning, May 9.

Finally, how did Twitter get this story out?  Take a look here at a graph:

As well as a story on NPR concerning Twitter breaking the news here.

If there are other ideas, suggestions, comments or questions, please let me know.  The last link I’d like to leave you with is from a former student who wrote about this on his blog, The Daily Voice of Reason.  Check it out.

 

 

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